Did You Say Passwords?

November 18, 2012
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This isn’t super huge news however periodically I do like to have a list of a dozen or so passwords handy to quickly try during tests. And since SplashData released this “Worst Passwords of 2012” list a few weeks ago from almost everything out there to date, I thought I’d post it as a future reference. You can also use the pic to the right for a quick look as well – it lists in 19 worst passwords from the 2011 version of this data set.

  1. password
  2. 123456
  3. 12345678
  4. abc123
  5. qwerty
  6. monkey
  7. letmein
  8. dragon
  9. 111111
  10. baseball
  11. iloveyou
  12. trustno1
  13. 1234567
  14. sunshine
  15. master
  16. 123123
  17. welcome
  18. shadow
  19. ashley
  20. football
  21. jesus
  22. michael
  23. ninja
  24. mustang
  25. password1

Source: “Worst passwords of 2012” – Help Net Security

And of course Bill Brenner pointed out this hilarious clip in a related post on the topic of passwords. Wow … in 20 years we’ve progressed one digit.

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Do you find things like this useful as a reference? If there are any other reference-type material you’d like to see blogged about, let us know in the comments below. Today’s post pic is from PBS.org. See ya!

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4 Responses to Did You Say Passwords?

  1. novainfosec (@novainfosec) on November 18, 2012 at 3:46 pm

    #NOVABLOGGER: Did You Say Passwords? http://t.co/rpjhvEm4 http://t.co/QHZzpfNL

  2. grecs (@grecs) on November 18, 2012 at 4:30 pm

    BLOGGED: Did You Say Passwords? http://t.co/uF5pJaZK

  3. Pity on November 19, 2012 at 3:54 am

    Why there is no Spaceballs password on the list? ;-)

  4. grecs (@grecs) on November 19, 2012 at 11:33 am

    BLOGGED: Did You Say Passwords? http://t.co/GjtPmFzg //Not sure why this reference post is getting so many hits.

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